n2y Creates First-Ever Symbol-Supported Weather Safety Materials in Partnership With the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Weather Ready Nation News-2-You newspaper

Huron, Ohio—Business Wire n2y partnered with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and their Weather-Ready Nation program to create symbol-supported weather safety materials made specifically for individuals with disabilities, making it the first of its kind.

n2y transformed NOAA’s informational weather safety materials into a News‑2‑You newspaper, entitled Weather-Ready Nation, and an additional collection of six safety resources in the form of interactive iDocs and PDF downloads. News-2-You and the safety resources use symbols paired with text to provide individuals with learning and language challenges appropriate and accessible safety materials. The newspaper also includes comprehension activities, games, a craft and a recipe.

“This is a great opportunity we have with NOAA and couldn’t be more timely with the landfall of Hurricane Florence,” said Chrissy Wostmann, n2y CEO. “It is the first time these weather resources have been transformed into a symbol-supported text, which is very exciting. Weather safety should be accessible to everyone because it is something we face every day.”

Lightning, heat, flood safety, wildfires, cold weather and tornadoes, along with their accompanying safety precautions, are discussed throughout the newspaper and in the additional resources. By covering a wide range of weather categories, one can be certain readers in all geographical areas can have life-saving information that is relevant to them, as well as information that can help them better understand complex concepts and new details and information.

The newspaper was released Sept. 10, 2018, and will be available to News‑2‑You subscribers through Sept. 24, 2018. The additional resources will be a long-standing, interactive or downloadable feature on the n2y website under eXtras!.

As a result of this partnership, n2y has also been named a Weather-Ready Nation Ambassador and is committed to helping NOAA improve the nation’s readiness against extreme weather, water and climate events in an accessible way.

“Ambassadors are critical to building a Weather-Ready Nation,” said Louis Uccellini, Ph.D., director of NOAA’s National Weather Service. “We welcome n2y as a new ambassador who is committed to empowering its customers with life-saving information about extreme weather events.”

Together, n2y and NOAA hope these valuable, accessible resources will help to prepare and educate individuals with disabilities on dangerous weather conditions in their area and the importance of safety precautions which in turn, will ensure their safety and well-being.

Subscribers, as well as those registered for an n2y login, can access the resources at n2y.com.

About n2y

n2y® is changing the way special education is taught by enabling students with disabilities access to the general education curriculum through its award-winning program, Unique Learning System®. News‑2‑You®, an engaging and relevant, weekly current events newspaper, SymbolStix PRIME®, a dynamic symbol database and materials creation platform and L3 Skills™, skills-based games for lifelong learning, make n2y a full solutions provider in special education. n2y is committed to providing age-appropriate learning solutions that impact and advance the lives of individuals with disabilities. With n2y solutions, everyone can learn. For more information, visit n2y.com and join them on Facebook and Twitter.

About NOAA

NOAA’s National Weather Service is the primary source of weather data, forecasts and warnings for the United States and its territories. NOAA’s National Weather Service operates the most advanced weather and flood warning and forecast system in the world, helping to protect lives and property and enhance the national economy. Working with partners, NOAA’s National Weather Service is building a Weather-Ready Nation to support community resilience in the face of increasing vulnerability to extreme weather. For more information, visit weather.gov.